First exoplanet and disk results with the PALM-3000 adaptive optics system
Richard Dekany  1, *@  , Rick Burruss  2@  , J. Chris Shelton  2@  , Ben Oppenheimer  3@  , Gautam Vasisht  2@  , Stanimir Metchev  4@  , Jennifer Roberts  2@  , Jonathan Tesch, Tuan Truong  2@  , Jennifer Milburn  1@  , David Hale  1@  , Christoph Baranec  1@  , Sergi Hildebrandt  2@  , Matthew Wahl  4@  , Chas Beichman  2@  , Lynne Hillenbrand  5@  , Rahul Patel  4@  , Sasha Hinkley  5@  , Eric Cady  2@  , Ian Parry  6@  
1 : Caltech Optical Observatories  (COO)
2 : Jet Propulsion Laboratory [NASA]  (JPL)
3 : American Museum of Natural History  (AMNH)
4 : Stony Brook University  (SUNY)  -  Website
Stony Brook, NY 11794 -  United States
5 : Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology
6 : Cambridge University
* : Corresponding author

We describe the status of the PALM-3000 adaptive optics facility instrument for the Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory. Since first light in June 2011, PALM-3000 has made significant advances in both performance and sensitivity. Using Strehl ratio as our performance metric, we present results in 64x64 and 32x32 wavefront sensor pupil sampling modes on a range of guide stars from V ~ 3 to 12. We describe our automated reconstructor pipeline tool, which incorporates pupil illumination and an optimal-estimator Baysian approach which serve to boost faint guide star performance. We conclude by presenting initial high-contrast circumstellar disk results from the PHARO vector vortex coronagraph and exoplanet spectra from the P1640 integral field spectrograph.



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